Fungi ID request please

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
Forum rules
Please do not ask for the identification of fungi for edibility or narcotic purposes. Any help provided by forum members is on the understanding that fungi are not to be consumed. Any deaths or serious poisonings are the responsibility of the person eating or preparing the fungus for others. If it is apparent from a post that the fungus is for eating or smoking etc, the post will be deleted and a warning given. Although many members do eat fungi, no-one would be willing to take someone else's life into their hands.
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NellyDee
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Joined: Tue May 19, 2015 12:51 pm
Location: NW Scotland

Fungi ID request please

Post by NellyDee » Wed Aug 30, 2017 9:54 am

Yes I am back with more ID requests. Possibly due to the weather different fungi have been appearing and not seen here before. For example under the Beech trees and in the gravel there about it was always Red Cracking Boletus - Boletus chrysenteron, which now have been replaced with swathes of Beech Milkcap - Lactarius blennius. Never seen so many Beech Sickeners - Russula nobilis (think these are favourites of the slugs virtually none are left uneaten).
So for ID Please - a Milkcap, but which - the spores are white and it smells mushroomy. Then the fungi growing in the rotting tree trunk - though clustered in and around the trunk it is also among the grass around it but dotted here and there as individual not clustered. next are these very small black (not purple as the photo seems to show) fungi growing in the moss, they are very slimy to touch, could not get a spore print as the underside - seemed to be gilled but with what looks like a gel covering them. No smell. I am not sure if the small clusters which are growing in the gravel behind a plant pot are the same fungi as that growing in the rotting tree trunk?
Lastly the slightly pointed capped fungi - just a family would be nice to know, unfortunately I cannot reach them so can only get a top photo. they are on the over side of fence to stop someone falling down extremely steep slope which is basically peat, beach mast and fallen leaves.
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roy betts
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Re: Fungi ID request please

Post by roy betts » Wed Aug 30, 2017 9:33 pm

From left to right:
possibly a Cortinarius; Coprinellus micaceus; maybe Sulphur Tuft??; 'Jelly Babies' - Leotia lubrica; Lactarius - maybe fluens; Lactarius - maybe quietus.

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NellyDee
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Posts: 94
Joined: Tue May 19, 2015 12:51 pm
Location: NW Scotland

Re: Fungi ID request please

Post by NellyDee » Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:15 am

Thank you Roy. When I looked up 'Jelly Babies' - Leotia lubrica; I came across a big discussion on black headed Leotia lubrica, arguing over 'was it caused by an infection'. Wonder if the debate was resolved or are black capped Leotia lubrica, now classed as a sub species.

Again trolling through images I looked for Lactarius fluens and quietus, and Lactarius generally and the nearest in looks is the wooly, but the ones here are smooth but cap pattern similar, they also have very white gills.

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