Woodwax?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Techoten
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Woodwax?

Post by Techoten » Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:58 pm

Hi
Not well up on Hygrophorus but these were in a mixed woodland, pine not larch. Could they be woodwaxes? - I didn't find an awful lot of info online the only yellow one being h. chrysodon. Both cap and stem were very, very sticky to the touch. White, smooth spores measuring ~ 7x5 um.
Any help appreciated, thanks!
Colin
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Fungi fir ID-1-5.jpg
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roy betts
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Re: Woodwax?

Post by roy betts » Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:09 pm

It's not unusual to find Waxcaps in woodland: there seems to be some green at the top of the stipe so could it be Hygrocybe psittacina?

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Woodwax?

Post by Chris Yeates » Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:41 pm

Gill attachment doesn't look right for Gliophorus psittacinus . . . I was thinking along similar lines, but that the hint of grey at stipe apex suggests G. laetus (=Hygrocybe laeta). Can't see the gill edge clearly enough, which is a pity.
Chris
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Techoten
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Re: Woodwax?

Post by Techoten » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:05 pm

Thanks to you both for your comments - waxcaps in woods, nothing is easy in mycology is it!
I have another picture of the gills from a more faded specimen if it helps, and also the spores. Didn't smell it but understand now it smells of burnt rubber if it's h. laeta. My memory of it was it was so sticky, I had to pull it off my fingers.
Colin
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Fungi fir ID-1-6.jpg
Fungi fir ID-3-3.jpg

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Woodwax?

Post by Chris Yeates » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:35 pm

Techoten wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:05 pm
Thanks to you both for your comments - waxcaps in woods, nothing is easy in mycology is it!
I have another picture of the gills from a more faded specimen if it helps, and also the spores. Didn't smell it but understand now it smells of burnt rubber if it's h. laeta. My memory of it was it was so sticky, I had to pull it off my fingers.
Colin
Thanks for that but you need a close look at the gill edge - which in G. laetus has a distinct, usually appearing paler, gelatinous edge (hand lens!). That said there's nothing about those spores (good image - but always worth one unstained, in water, as well) to rule out that species - that's what I would be considering.
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Re: Woodwax?

Post by roy betts » Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:14 am

I'm sure Chris is right.
The spores are a better fit for size with laeta. The apex may indeed be grey and the distinctly decurrent gills are also a better fit. We don't have many areas with low pH around here and when I do find this species, it tends to have a brownish-orange cap.
Woodlands that produce waxcaps are often young stands that were grasslands probably 60-70 years ago rather than ancient woodland. Apparently in North America, waxcaps only grow in woodlands...

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adampembs
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Re: Woodwax?

Post by adampembs » Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:39 pm

roy betts wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:14 am

Woodlands that produce waxcaps are often young stands that were grasslands probably 60-70 years ago rather than ancient woodland. Apparently in North America, waxcaps only grow in woodlands...
Someone was arguing the reverse of this the other day :) Nearly all our grassland sites were once woodland, although we are talking 1000s of years, and the person was saying the trees are gone but the fungi remained. Waxcaps thrive in poor soil, and woodland sites remaining today are generally the ones where the soil is too poor to grow crops, especially in acid areas. We recently found G.laeta in a semi-natural ancient woodland site in the Gwaun Valley near Pontfaen.
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Techoten
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Re: Woodwax?

Post by Techoten » Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:39 pm

Many thanks for the help.
I passed again yesterday and had another look. I could not see much evidence on the gill edge except a slight lightening, but the apex of the stipe was definitely grey as in the photo.
Colin.
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Fungi fir ID-1-11.jpg
Fungi fir ID-2-9.jpg

gary
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Re: Woodwax?

Post by gary » Sat Oct 14, 2017 8:02 am

In Boertmann there's a yellow variety - used to be Hygrocybe laeta flava- though I can't remember ever seeing it.

In laeta usually the caps go pinkish tan as they get older rather than paler

Let's hope the newish name Gliophorus laetus is the last one it gets (based on DNA sequencing it should be). I think the changing of latin names of fungi is one thing that puts people off fungi.

Gary

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Re: Woodwax?

Post by Techoten » Sun Oct 15, 2017 5:48 pm

Many thanks Gary.

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