Lecanora saligna Group Species?

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Neil Sanderson
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Lecanora saligna Group Species?

Post by Neil Sanderson » Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:35 am

In March I collected a Lecanora species from lignum on a fallen Sweet Chestnut trunk in Studley Park, Fountains Abbey, Yorkshire. This appears to be a Lecanora saligna group species but I can not fully match it to any species description, however, it does appear similar to poorly developed material I have collected from Pine bark in the New Forest.

The thallus was brown warted and rough, the apothecia had pale margins, which were raised in young apothecia but which were partly excluded in the most mature apothecia. The disks are brown but are strongly pruinose with a thick covering of pale white-grey pruina.

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Lecanora sp on Sweet Chestnut lignum

The crystals in epithecium and margin fine, yellow in polarised light and soluble in K

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Lecanora sp, apothecia cross-section in normal light

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Lecanora sp, apothecia cross-section in polarised light

The paraphyses branched with swollen cap to 2.5 – 3µm with, and dark pigmented at the tip. The asci were 25 – 28 x 10µm and the spores simple 7 – 10 x 3µm. The spores are rather narrow for their length compared to any any other Lecanora saligna group species that I can find descriptions of.

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Lecanora sp, apothecia squash, with paraphyses, asci and spores.

Pycnidia frequent and about 160µm across, but unhelpfully these only contain miroconidia, which are simple and 2 x 1µm. I could not find any maroconidia, which are much more diagnostic in this group.

Any one with any ideals?

(PS I will put the taxa up on the https://lecanomics.org/data/ site, if I ever manage to log in, but the site seems to have an issue at the moment, either with with Macs and iPhones or possibly just everyone)

Neil
Neil Sanderson

Neil Sanderson
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Re: Lecanora saligna Group Species?

Post by Neil Sanderson » Mon Jun 10, 2019 7:15 am

Rereading Boom & Brand (2008) The Lichenologist 40(6): 465–497 as holiday reading (!), I think this may actually be Lecanora sarcopidoides; this has similar spores and micropycnidia and does look similar in macro characters https://www.verspreidingsatlas.nl/7362. If so, a very rarely recorded species in Britain. The key in Boom & Brand (2008) is a bit misleading as the thallus reactions in the key contradict the reactions given in the text for Lecanora sarcopidoides. I will explore further when I get back.

All the best

Neil
Neil Sanderson

Neil Sanderson
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Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2019 7:30 am

Re: Lecanora saligna Group Species?

Post by Neil Sanderson » Mon Jul 08, 2019 10:25 pm

As promised I have got back to the Fountains Abbey specimen, and yes it is strongly KC + yellow, so is fairly definitely Lecanora sarcopidoides!

Also I have gone and found more. I am currently doing a small job on the section (not very big) of Knole Park owned by the National Trust. This has some nice habitat in ancient deer park with lots of ancient trees and fallen dead wood. As with other parks in regions formerly heavily acidified by air pollution, the lichen assembage of the dead wood and dry bark on the ancient trees is proving to be much better than was thought and something of a recovery appears to have occurred. In this habitat I found Protoparmelia oleagina, Chaenothecopsis nigra, Microcalicium ahlneri, Chaenotheca stemonea, Chaenotheca hispidula and Micarea misella, while moist bark on old Beech produced Lecanora sublivescens and Mycoporum antecellens and I also found Cladonia callosa in acid grassland. As well as this there was some lovely material of Lecanora sarcopidoides on the sides of two large logs. This had a paler cream thallus compared to the Yorkshire material, but was otherwise similar. The KC + yellow reaction was easy to see in the field, a good way of being sure was to drawn up K placed on the lichen with a tissue and then apply the C to the K solution on the tissue. A strong and bright yellow reaction can be seen.

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The habitat of Lecanora sarcopidoides, the species was abundant in the side of this log

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Lecanora sarcopidoides, taken using a Lichen Candelaris/iPhone combination in the field. The apothecia disks get blacker as they age and the purina disappears from some but is very clear on younger disks

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Lecanora sarcopidoides, part of a specimen at x20

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Lecanora sarcopidoides, part of a specimen at x40


Finally I had another look at some very scrappy material from Scots Pine in glades in ancient Beech woods in the New Forest, with apothecia with pruinose disks looking very like the young disks on the better specimens of Lecanora sarcopidoides and also with similar sized spores. There was not much thallus with these, but I was able to get a KC + yellow reaction from this (while finally destroying the specimen). So this is also probably Lecanora sarcopidoides,although I would like find more developed material.

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Possible Lecanora sarcopidoides apothecia with Calicium parvum, Scots Pine in bog Wosson's Hill, New Forest

One to look out for elsewhere, so far I have only seen it in quality habitat and it appear to be rare across Europe

Neil
Neil Sanderson

Neil Sanderson
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Re: Lecanora saligna Group Species?

Post by Neil Sanderson » Fri Jul 26, 2019 11:03 pm

A final update on Lecanora sarcopidoides. On my second visit to Knole Park I found two more locations for this species, so there is a substantial population here. Additional interest added included Lecidea hypopta and Micarea globulosella, so a very rich lignum assemblage in the end.

I also went through my herbarium and found three more Lecanora sarcopidoides specimens miss-named either Lecanora albellula or Lecanora piniperda with heavily pruinose apothecia disks and strong KC + yellow reactions, one from Oak lignum in the New Forest, one from Pine bark in the Surrey heaths and one from Oak lignum in Windsor Great Park.

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Lecidea hypopta on Oak lignum, a northern species, rare in the south

Neil
Neil Sanderson

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