Unidentified fungi from NT Longshaw Estate

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Bob Hazell
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Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2016 12:41 pm

Unidentified fungi from NT Longshaw Estate

Post by Bob Hazell » Wed Dec 19, 2018 6:17 pm

I photographed these fungi (and several others) at the National Trust Longshaw Estate in Derbyshire on 9th December and clearly didn't pay sufficient attention, initially believing them to be Waxcaps as they are so prevalent across the estate. They were all growing in grazed unimproved pasture land interspersed with mixed woodland. They were all abundant generally growing in small groups of two or three.
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I suspect these are all the same. The cap was up to 5cms and in some specimens appeared striate at the margin. The centre of the cap appeared slightly darker. The stipe is either off white or fawn but certainly not white. For a Waxcap e.g. Hygrocybe virginea I would expect a pure white cap and stipe and therefore wonder whether the fungi are Collybia/Gymnopus aquosa.
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The specimen above, however, does have a pure white stipe and a cap which is grey/fawn towards the centre. I suspect this may be Hygrocybe virginea.
The final specimen (below) may just be one that is over mature but it occurred to me that it may be Collybia/Gymnopus dryophila.
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I appreciate I haven't given detailed descriptions but hope the photographs will do the "talking". As always any help would be much appreciated.

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