Unusual cup fungus

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Bob Hazell
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Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2016 12:41 pm

Unusual cup fungus

Post by Bob Hazell » Thu Feb 28, 2019 6:40 pm

Another fungus from Draycote Water near Rugby. This fungus was found growing in the base of a moth trap. The trap is basically a wooden box containing a light to attract moths. Over the past 2 -3 months it has been out of use and housed inside a dark garage. The fungus was growing singularly and in small clumps. The cup varied from about 0.5cm diameter to about 1.5 cm diameter. The inside of the cup is smooth but the external surface is extremely "warty" or granular. The first photo shows the fungus in-situ. There appears to be some form of white mould in the vicinity and also leaf and possibly moth debris. The next photos show the fungus having been cut out and placed on a nearby log. The final image shows a small specimen - although the photo is poor it does show the stipe. Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
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mollisia
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Re: Unusual cup fungus

Post by mollisia » Sun Mar 03, 2019 10:50 am

Hello,

this is a Peziza species.
Judging from the ecology one would tent to name that Peziza cerea, which is a species within the varia-complex. But the strongly granulose outer surface is somewhat unusual and would suggest a species like P. granulosa or P. granularis, which however don't occure on walls (usually).

The fruitbodies seem to be too young to give relevant microscopical details. If you have mature spores and a microscope, it is essential to look at the spores: are there one or more oildrops inside (= granulosa/granularis) or are they empty (varia s.l.). Are they smooth or warted (I think they must be smooth, but who knows ....). If they are ornamented it is none of the suggested species.

best regards,
Andreas

Bob Hazell
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Posts: 124
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2016 12:41 pm

Re: Unusual cup fungus

Post by Bob Hazell » Sun Mar 03, 2019 11:26 am

Thank you Andreas. Unfortunately I do not have a microscope and this is something I clearly need to progress to. After I had submitted this post I recalled that I had previously posted another cup fungus that had received a detailed response from Chris Yeates. He provided me with the following informative link: https://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/hand ... sequence=1
In the absence of microscopy for the time being I have recorded the latest images as Peziza cf varia. Out of interest this fungus is growing not on a wall but effectively on the inside of a wooden box. The box is probably made from plywood.
Many thanks for your pointers and guidance - it's much appreciated.
Regards,
Bob

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