I'm only trying to get to genus

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Simon Horsnall
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I'm only trying to get to genus

Post by Simon Horsnall » Fri Oct 09, 2015 1:53 pm

As part of my fungal education, I'm trying to get to genus with a number of specimens of macrofungi before I even start trying to determine species. I set myself the target of three today but only came back with two (but I did get a lichen and a caddisfly).

If you can do them to species, please don't spoil it for me (unless you know there is some critical feature that will be destroyed on drying).

1. Growing under Betula canopy on quite wet ground. Alnus and Crataegus also present but quite distant.
Picture 023.jpg
Picture 024.jpg
Picture 025.jpg
I'm thinking Boletus.
Last edited by Simon Horsnall on Fri Oct 09, 2015 1:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Simon Horsnall
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Re: I'm only trying to get to genus

Post by Simon Horsnall » Fri Oct 09, 2015 1:57 pm

2. By far the commonest fungus I saw today, growing in vast troops. Betula, Crataegus and Salix present, generally growing in grassland away from the canopy. Spore print will almost certainly turn out to be white or very pale cream as all the mature fruit bodies looked like explosions in icing sugar factories.
Picture 017.jpg
The young gills and stipe had a distinct pinkish flush to them
Picture 019.jpg
Picture 020.jpg
Mature gills were more creamish
Picture 021.jpg
Closest I seem to come if Clitocybe (using MycoKey) but I'm not absolutely convinced.

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: I'm only trying to get to genus

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Oct 09, 2015 2:34 pm

Simon Horsnall wrote:. . . . . If you can do them to species, please don't spoil it for me . . . . .
1. Growing under Betula canopy on quite wet ground. Alnus and Crataegus also present but quite distant.
I'm thinking Boletus.
Hi Simon, I'm taking it by your "don't spoil it" comment, that you don't want people to say what species they are - so I won't. ;)
Your first is without doubt a bolete, but as for genus, try looking at the Leccinum species.
Simon Horsnall wrote:2. By far the commonest fungus I saw today, growing in vast troops. Betula, Crataegus and Salix present, generally growing in grassland away from the canopy. Spore print will almost certainly turn out to be white or very pale cream as all the mature fruit bodies looked like explosions in icing sugar factories.
Closest I seem to come if Clitocybe (using MycoKey) but I'm not absolutely convinced.
For your second, I'd be looking at Lactarius. (If you have samples, and before they are dried out, it would be worth seeing if you can get the fruitbody to "milk" by damaging the gills etc.
Take note of the characteristics of any "milk" that is produced, as it will likely be relevant in determination of species.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

Simon Horsnall
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Re: I'm only trying to get to genus

Post by Simon Horsnall » Fri Oct 09, 2015 2:57 pm

Thanks Mike and thanks for not spoiling it.

The second had me thinking Lactarius initially (it is very brittle) but I couldn't seem to get any liquid out of it when I cut it in the field. I can just about squeeze something liquid out of the specimens but you can turn anything to mush with enough brute force and ignorance (I have both in spades).

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Re: I'm only trying to get to genus

Post by Flaxton » Fri Oct 09, 2015 10:41 pm

Simon
In your last photo you can see the milk that should take you to Lactarius and with the hairs and pale colour I would think L pubescens is a likely choice. The first Leccinum we would need to see the colour of the flesh when the specimen is cut in half to be sure. I suspect L cyanobasileucum would be the one.
Mal

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Re: I'm only trying to get to genus

Post by Waxcap » Sat Oct 10, 2015 8:53 am

Simon Horsnall wrote:Thanks Mike and thanks for not spoiling it.
The second had me thinking Lactarius initially (it is very brittle) but I couldn't seem to get any liquid out of it when I cut it in the field. I can just about squeeze something liquid out of the specimens but you can turn anything to mush with enough brute force and ignorance (I have both in spades).
Spoiler Alert - don't read the previous post! :D

The "milk" appears on the gills if you break them a little or if you just slice the edges with a knife. With smaller ones I usually hold the cap upside down and flex it a little, to cack some gills, then release the pressure and you will see the milk appear where the gills were cracked.

Dave

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Re: I'm only trying to get to genus

Post by Simon Horsnall » Sat Oct 10, 2015 10:17 am

Thanks all. I was expecting something a little more convincing for the "milk" (what is the correct name for it?). Perhaps the specimen was a little dry? Anyway, seeing as we've gone down the determination to species line, the milk is white and unchanging. On the tip of the tongue, initially it was mild with an intense hot sensation appearing after 1-2 seconds.

The Leccinum stipe flesh went from white to coffee-brown almost immediately on cutting. The base was almost unchanging.

I'm not really expecting to get to species. I just wanted to get a feel for some of the characters in the genera keys and perhaps practise taking some sections, looking at spores, etc.

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Re: I'm only trying to get to genus

Post by jimmymac2 » Sat Oct 10, 2015 11:05 am

Hi Simon,
The 'correct' name for the milk is latex. If you're ready for species just say (I think I know the second one).
James
Always keep your eyes open... :shock:

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