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Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 10:03 pm
by Lancashire Lad
adampembs wrote:Thanks Mike. You need to click the "large" option on page referred by the link. It actually carries 880g, but I appreciate what you're saying. I'll report back :D
I thought I had done - but was somehow still looking at the description for the small version. :oops:
If it will solidly support 880g, then it should be OK. ;)
I'm still inclined to recommend a "normal" type tripod similar to the 785 though, as I think they offer more overall versatility for general use.

Regards,
Mike.

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 12:17 pm
by Chris Yeates
Lancashire Lad wrote:
adampembs wrote: Many folk feel that carrying a decent tripod is a bit of a bind, (I used to be of that opinion anyway). However, I soon realised that my shots were suffering as a result, so nowadays, I never set out without. I don't use flash, and exposure times are regularly in the seconds rather than fractions of seconds, so the tripod is essential, and it needs to perform flawlessly in as many situations as possible. . . . the 055XB/405 head I use with the Nikon kit weighs in at almost 5kg. - Now that one you do notice when carrying it around all day!
Regards,
Mike.
It's horses for courses. With the project I'm engaged in the 'field shots' are very much a record of the fungus with its habitat - I couldn't aspire to the quality of Mike's shots; but having suffered some v. nasty backpain recently which knocked me out of any sort of action* I try to travel as light as possible - a Nikon D40 suffices (I recently bought a lighter Lumix FZ200, but get irritated by the lack of control I'm used to with DSLRs, perhaps I just need to persevere). Using flash is therefore the price I pay, though I do tend to ensure it's not always at the 'Full' setting, so slightly underexposed and then Photoshopped later - I also keep a keen eye on white balance . . . .
When I get back home it's a different matter, using the Canon MP-E on a copy stand, and taking numerous micro-shots is where I have to put the effort in; one of my composite 'plates' can take over 200 shots amounting to some 5Gb of data before stacking and rejecting arrive at the final image generally a 60Mb tiff and a 500Kb jpeg, with the images I have used for the final plate archived as Tiffs - so it can add up to 500Mb per plate :o .

Chris

* I can recommend a brilliant osteopath in Huddersfield . . . .

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 6:28 pm
by Wood Wanderer
Chris Yeates wrote:
Lancashire Lad wrote:
adampembs wrote: Many folk feel that carrying a decent tripod is a bit of a bind, (I used to be of that opinion anyway). However, I soon realised that my shots were suffering as a result, so nowadays, I never set out without. I don't use flash, and exposure times are regularly in the seconds rather than fractions of seconds, so the tripod is essential, and it needs to perform flawlessly in as many situations as possible. . . . the 055XB/405 head I use with the Nikon kit weighs in at almost 5kg. - Now that one you do notice when carrying it around all day!
Regards,
Mike.
It's horses for courses. With the project I'm engaged in the 'field shots' are very much a record of the fungus with its habitat - I couldn't aspire to the quality of Mike's shots; but having suffered some v. nasty backpain recently which knocked me out of any sort of action* I try to travel as light as possible - a Nikon D40 suffices (I recently bought a lighter Lumix FZ200, but get irritated by the lack of control I'm used to with DSLRs, perhaps I just need to persevere). Using flash is therefore the price I pay, though I do tend to ensure it's not always at the 'Full' setting, so slightly underexposed and then Photoshopped later - I also keep a keen eye on white balance . . . .
When I get back home it's a different matter, using the Canon MP-E on a copy stand, and taking numerous micro-shots is where I have to put the effort in; one of my composite 'plates' can take over 200 shots amounting to some 5Gb of data before stacking and rejecting arrive at the final image generally a 60Mb tiff and a 500Kb jpeg, with the images I have used for the final plate archived as Tiffs - so it can add up to 500Mb per plate :o .

Chris

* I can recommend a brilliant osteopath in Huddersfield . . . .
Having seen a number of the finished plates all I can say is it is worth all the effort, simply first class Chris, one of these days I will find a decent excuse to buy an MP-E .....

John

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 6:43 pm
by adampembs
Wood Wanderer wrote:
Having seen a number of the finished plates all I can say is it is worth all the effort, simply first class Chris..

John
Agreed. Can I have a signed copy when the book comes out ;)

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 6:46 pm
by Flaxton
Chris is going to need a big print run just for his "friends";)
Mla

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 8:38 pm
by Wood Wanderer
Flaxton wrote:Chris is going to need a big print run just for his "friends";)
Mla
So in awe you are having trouble spelling your own name ... :lol: :lol: :lol:

John

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 9:36 pm
by Flaxton
Fingers working faster than the brain.
Mal

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Sat Sep 26, 2015 9:05 pm
by adampembs
Camera came, and the tripod is quite solid, but can be pretty low.
P1010769.JPG
Some images I took today. Some are even in focus! Lots of settings...and lots to learn!

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Sat Sep 26, 2015 9:47 pm
by Flaxton
Adam that looks to be a good set of photos from the new set up. Still a bit big for a pocket camera but enjoy and keep posting for others to enjoy.
Mal

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 10:24 am
by adampembs
In retrospect, I am regretting buying the HS10. While it is a decent camera, it is hardly a compact, being quite bulky and heavy to carry around the neck.
I also find the controls overwhelming, it offers a lot of flexibility and fine controls, but this means taking a photo is not a case of point and click. First, in automatic mode, it doesn't save the preference for macro mode, you have to set it every time. I should probably use a custom mode for this, but would probably forget about it later. I also find the auto-focus isn't reliable in low light conditions, and manually focussing is another time consuming thing, that I find difficult as my eyes are not so good, to see the focussing on the screen.
My main dislike though is for long walks/forays, I no longer take it, as it is too heavy, and has to go in a backpack to avoid neckstrain. My old LX5 fitted comfortably in the pocket of my fleece and I found the photos it took were good and easy to obtain. In the hands of a skilled photographer like Mike, the HS10 gives outstanding results, but for a simpleton like me, it's overcomplicated :(

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 5:00 pm
by adampembs
Well I'm thinking of getting a portable compact camera and the TG4 was recommended earlier in the topic. This was 3 years ago, so I dont know if there are any "new kids on the block" wrt cameras. Are there any publications that do camera reviews that focus on the criteria important for fungi enthusiasts? ie dark, damp conditions, and macro capability? I stopped subscribing to the FCS and the BMS is quite pricey. Do any of their magazines do camera reviews?

Re: Compact/Portable cameras

Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2018 6:17 am
by Chris Johnson
Hi Adam

I use the Olympus TG4 with excellent results. I opted for this camera because of its underwater facility (I also record marine and freshwater algae). I restrict its use, however, to long treks or difficult terrain such as slippery seaweed-covered rocks. Otherwise I prefer to carry my DSLR and tripod.

Regards, Chris