Woodland Mushroom Identification

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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eltio
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Re: Woodland Mushroom Identification

Post by eltio » Tue Apr 09, 2019 6:34 pm

Can't disagree. I'm not trying to push Armillaria as an ID, but neither Galerina nor Tubaria seem right either.

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adampembs
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Re: Woodland Mushroom Identification

Post by adampembs » Tue Apr 09, 2019 10:36 pm

eltio wrote:
Tue Apr 09, 2019 6:34 pm
Can't disagree. I'm not trying to push Armillaria as an ID, but neither Galerina nor Tubaria seem right either.
There are around 48 Galerina species, and 5 Tubaria species. The first step in any agaric ID is a spore print. :)
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mollisia
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Re: Woodland Mushroom Identification

Post by mollisia » Sat Apr 13, 2019 7:13 pm

Hello,

I think one can be sure that this is a brown spored fungus. In the middle fruitbody the ring is beset with brown spore powder, at least it seems to me so.
So anyway, there are not many genera which share the following characters:
- cap and gills uniformely brown
- stipe with memranaceous ring zone
- stipe with with silky covering
- growing on wood

Tubaria wouldn't have such a ring zone, except Tubaria confragosa. But this species doesn't have a silky white stipe and occurs on coniferous wood or birch.
Pholiotina had come to my mind too, but there the ring is even more stable and moreover these species don't occure on wood but on soil.
A Galerina from the marginata group is in my opinion the most likely answer, and all feature fit well. G. marginata does occure in Central Europe more often on decidous wood than on coniferous wood, and the fruitbodies on decidous wood always look somewhat stouter t(like yours!) than those from conifers.

Here a foto of galerina marginata from a pure beech forest, on rotten stem of Fagus - b.t.w. on the same stem also Kuehneromyces mutabilis occured at the same time .....

best regards,
Andreas
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Galerina_marginata_G4.jpg

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