Blue-green hyphomycete

Corticoids, Crusts, Brackets, and any non-mushroom like fungi growing on wood
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Aciauda
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Blue-green hyphomycete

Post by Aciauda » Mon Jul 08, 2019 5:44 am

I hope this is the correct forum for this query
Please help with id. I have searched E&E but cannot find it
It was found on a stick with beech ash and oak in mixed woodland. The general view is with a 5p coin 11mm in diameter

Close up appearance
1 gv with 5p.jpg
gv with 5p piece 11mm diam
3 LP.jpg
LP diss mic
4 at medium.jpg
Medium diss mic
The wood of the stick was very rotten, broad leaf
2 on b-l wood.jpg
wood possibly beech?
The hyphae branched at more or less right angles and the conidiophores were lecithiform, like skittles.
Conidiophore 1.jpg
Photo 5
Conidiphore 2 (1).jpg
Photo 6
Conidiphore 2 (3).jpg
Photo 7
The spores were greenish in water subglobose 3.6x2.9 μm
Spores x 100.jpg
Phot 8

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Post by Chris Yeates » Thu Jul 11, 2019 11:48 am

Hi
I would check out Trichoderma for starters (anamorphic Hypocreales). The conidiophores (phialides in this case) are actually not lecythiform - they are flask-shaped, the head of the "skittle" being a conidium being budded off.
Hope that helps
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

Aciauda
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Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Post by Aciauda » Thu Jul 11, 2019 5:24 pm

Hi Chris
Thank you, I have checked out E&E and found Chromocrea aureoviridis to be nearest. It did not seem to fit exactly so I went onto Google Images to find a paper by Priscila Chaverri and Gary J. Samuels - 'Hypocrea/Trichoderma... with green spores'. That seemed to be right. It offers a key to the species reported which is ok till I get to the couplet
15. Phialides on average > 8.5 μm long ............................................................................................................... 16
Phialides on average < 8.5 μm long ............................................................................................................... 21
My phliades are 6.5-8 μm long
And the .pfd key runs out there. So I am stuck
I think I am on the right track, though. Do you agree?
Yours aye
Archie

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Post by Lancashire Lad » Thu Jul 11, 2019 6:08 pm

Aciauda wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 5:24 pm
. . . . And the .pfd key runs out there. So I am stuck . . . .
Hi Archie,

The PDF you have, as you have already discovered, ends at page 36. - (The full paper PDF is actually 119 pages in total).

This link allows PDF download of that full paper, (wherein the dichotomous key obviously continues accordingly): -

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pr ... ion_detail

(You have to click on the blue "Download Full-Text PDF" link, towards top right corner of page).

NB: when you click on that link, you get an interim page which mentions (not immediately obvious) that your download is in progress.
Just wait a few seconds, (without clicking on anything else), and the full 119 page PDF will appear.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

Aciauda
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Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Post by Aciauda » Sat Jul 13, 2019 6:18 pm

Hi Mike
This is very helpful. I have downloaded the .pdf from your link and am trying to save it. In the meantime I have rushed through the rest of the key and can see I shall have to take this more slowly. My hyphomycete does not key out yet. I will persist and tell you where the key leads me in the end.
Many thanks again
Yours aye
Archie

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Post by Chris Yeates » Sat Jul 13, 2019 7:26 pm

Hi Archie
A much more up to date treatment is here (again open source and downloadable):
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 1614000505. It has lots of useful references, and despite the title is of relevance to Britain (especially with climate change ;) ).
But do bear in mind these are tricky waters, unless you are at the least culturing the stuff. Fun to have a run at mind :)
Best
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

Aciauda
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Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Post by Aciauda » Mon Jul 15, 2019 7:53 pm

Oh dear, Chris, I am well out of my depth but delighted at the information in this link of yours. The depth of the experience of these authors and the utter beauty of their illustrations I will remember and keep in my new Trichoderma folder. But I see what you mean. It was as I feared it might be. I have tried again and again over the years to identify Hyphomycetes and nearly always failed. That is why I thought I might get a glimmering of hope by asking you all at FungusUK. Now I have seen all this that you and Mike have shown me I fear I must back off again. There is no way that I shall be able to produce even the light microscope information far less the EM and culture information. I actually had three specimens I was going to bring to you for a little help.
I think on balance that having ventured to the doorway of another huge gallery of the fungal world I must just turn round and go 'home' to more chunky world of caps and stems, ascomycetes, crusts and brackets, etc.
Thank you both very much for such a huge amount of help. I am delighted and amazed and severely chastened.
With all good wishes
Archie

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