mushroom identification

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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petergibbinson
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mushroom identification

Post by petergibbinson » Sat Aug 31, 2019 2:14 pm

Photos attached of some mushrooms appeared on my lawn ...struggling a bit to identify them - the white crowded gills rule out a lot of species.
Maximum diameter approx 8cm
My thoughts were potentially -

Wood mushroom (but doesn't have the aniseed smell supposed to be present)
Deathcap or deatchap var.alba - doesn't appear to be a volva, so seems unlikely
macrolepiota excoriata - although the shape doesn't quite look right..
Any other suggestions...
Attachments
IMG_2528.JPG
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: mushroom identification

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sat Aug 31, 2019 5:09 pm

Hi, and welcome to UK Fungi.

The caps bear a remarkable resemblance to Amanita citrina var. alba, but that's usually a woodland dweller. - I've never seen it in anything like a lawn type situation.

Both Deathcap and False Deathcap have white gills, although they can turn more creamy and have hints of pink with age.

The top photo does have hints of pink on the gills, (but not as much as I would have expected for any of the typical Agaricus species). - I'm wondering if it might be some sort of colour cast on the image?

If they are on your lawn, I'd suggest very carefully digging one up in its entirety, to reveal the intact stem base.

Deathcaps, both normal and var. alba, have a definite sac-like volva. (But to me, these don't have the look of Deathcaps).
False Deathcap, A.citrina, (including var. alba), also has a volva, but it is more like a solid round ball, with an obvious blunt "gutter" at the top, where it meets the actual base of the stem.

At least then, we will know whether or not they do have volva's in one form or another.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

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adampembs
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Re: mushroom identification

Post by adampembs » Sun Sep 01, 2019 7:34 am

Maybe Leucoagaricus leucothites but I'm not familiar with this species.
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: mushroom identification

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:28 am

The more I look at the cap images, they just appear to be "knobbly" rather than breaking up into veil remnants as those of A.citrina would.

It would be interesting to see a couple of cap shots of more mature examples just to see what the tops age like. - And maybe a close up of the gills and stem ring.

Regards,
Mike
Common sense is not so common.

petergibbinson
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Re: mushroom identification

Post by petergibbinson » Tue Sep 03, 2019 7:03 pm

Yes definitely looks like Leucoagaricus leucothites (white dapperling) - interesting I ruled it out as my guide says greyish gills becoming pinkish (these are almost pure white) and it says cap to 6 cm across (but I measured one at 8cm ..although that had flattened out)

However looking at photos online it looks an almost perfect match .... little bit of a relief as my 5 year old and his friends frequently play in the garden - mind you they are taught very clearly - no picking no licking!

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Re: mushroom identification

Post by adampembs » Tue Sep 03, 2019 10:21 pm

Amanita is a genus of ectomyxorrizal fungi, ie its symbiotic with trees and only certain trees. Are there any trees nearby? (btw, it just looks wrong for Amanita in any case.)
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petergibbinson
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Re: mushroom identification

Post by petergibbinson » Thu Sep 12, 2019 7:04 am

Nearest trees about 20 ft away - fascinating this trying to identify fungi.... so much variation depending on age etc.
As an aside do mushrooms ever cross hybridise (i.e genome hybridisation)? So you could have species combining to make identification even harder!

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