Microbotryum saponariae

Plant diseases
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Chris Johnson
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Microbotryum saponariae

Post by Chris Johnson » Mon May 11, 2020 10:45 am

Growing on the anthers of a cultivated species: Saponaria x olivana.
Spores purplish-brown, almost globose (Q = 1.1) 6.3–8.2 µm
It would seem to be rare in the wild. I've not be able to ascertain its status on cultivated species.
Regards,
Chris

(One I prepared 3 days ago but had trouble accessing the site.)
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Chris Yeates
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Re: Microbotryum saponariae

Post by Chris Yeates » Sat May 16, 2020 11:07 am

Chris Johnson wrote:
Mon May 11, 2020 10:45 am
I've not be able to ascertain its status on cultivated species.
Interesting - a smut I've never seen. Round here when one sees Saponaria officinalis, either in gardens or as an escape on "waste" ground, it's more often the "flore pleno" double form. So fewer or no anthers . . . . also while the normal form is apparently nectar-rich (and therefore attracting insect vectors) the double form has very little nectar. All a bit circumstantial but there you go.
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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