Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Jan 24, 2020 11:38 am

First Lake District visit of 2020!

The Lake District weather forecast for Monday 20th January looked quite promising: - “Sunny periods with frost and possible fog in valleys during the morning”.
So, on that basis, I decided to have a look on Gladstone Knott near Crinkle Crags, to try to find “Gladstone’s Finger”, a seldom visited rock pinnacle mentioned in Alfred Wainwright’s “Pictorial Guides to the Lakeland Fells”. (Book 4, Southern Fells – Crinkle Crags 5).
As things turned out, the forecast got it decidedly wrong for the area I was interested in! – The valley was clear, as was the entire skyline around the Langdale Pikes, but the higher parts of all the fells around Crinkle Crags were shrouded in low lying cloud, which despite extremely strong and blustery winds, hung there all day.

I set off from the National Trust car park at the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel, and walked through Stool End Farm into Oxendale.
Following Oxendale Beck as far as the second footbridge near the confluence below Whorneyside Force waterfall, I crossed the bridge and then within a few yards crossed Crinkle Gill, (via boulders as stepping stones), to begin the fellside ascent, (with Crinkle Gill now on my right, and Isaac Gill on my left), up towards Gladstone Knott.

Initially, a vague grassy path, (more of a sheep trod), could be followed. But that soon disappeared, and it was then a case of picking the best looking route over various grassy and slightly boggy areas as I headed upwards towards the crags.
I became enveloped in thick mist just as I reached the level of the lower rocky outcrops, so just had to take the most likely looking route, as each outcrop appeared through the mist. I had to make a slight north-westerly diversion to skirt one particularly steep looking crag, but when I traversed back across its top I saw what must surely be my target about 50 yards higher up, just on the limit of vision. Getting up to the pinnacle, (and continuing beyond it), involved ascending a very steep, and extremely loose scree slope.

I’d intended carrying on up to Crinkle Crags after photographing the pinnacle, but what with the mist, and the extremely strong and gusty wind, I decided to abandon that thought!
Instead, I traversed across the plateau above Great Knott, until I came to the main Red Tarn to Crinkle Crags path. I followed that path down to the Red Tarn “crossroads”, and turned northwards for the final descent via Brown Howe, back to valley level. Eventually retracing my earlier route through Stool End Farm and back to the car.
I did find what I'd set out for, but not a great day weatherwise, and so the pinnacle will need a revisit, when the weather is being more amenable!

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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#GPS Track - 1 to 50000 Scale.jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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#Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
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And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – Looking towards Crinkle Crags. (Pike O’Blisco at left, The Band at right). – From the road in front of the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel.
Photo 02 – A snowy looking Bow Fell, viewed from Stool End Farm.
Photo 03 – The route ahead. – Looking towards the head of Oxendale, with Isaac Gill to left, and a stony looking Crinkle Gill over to the right.
Photo 04 – The view back down Oxendale, towards Great Langdale.
Photo 05 – Slightly higher up the fellside, and looking towards the Langdale Pikes and the Great Langdale valley.
Photo 06 – Now up in the mist, and a first glimpse of (a not very obvious from this angle!) Gladstone’s Finger.
Photo 07 – Having finally managed to climb up the horrendously loose scree, a shot of Gladstone’s Finger from above. – The photo doesn’t do any justice to just how steep and exceptionally loose that scree slope was!!!
Photo 08 – A closer view of Gladstone’s Finger.
Photo 09 – Now back in the valley, and a shot of the Oxendale sheepfold, with the stubborn mist still hanging over where I’d been earlier.
Photo 10 – A final shot, showing how very different the conditions can be just one valley away. – This is what the weather on the Langdale Pikes had been like all day.

If you would like to see a more extensive description, and lots more photos from this walk, see: -
https://www.walklakes.co.uk/forum/viewt ... ?f=2&t=738
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Common sense is not so common.

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NellyDee
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by NellyDee » Mon Mar 30, 2020 11:18 am

I do like photos of craggy places and mountains in mist they give a sort of mystical feeling. Good for you going out in such weather. My daughter took me to The Ross of Mull for a week where we had a major storm, so could not go out. We got so fed up with brown seaweed and muddy slopes we drove up to Carsaigh and also up Loch Na Keal. All our photos are misty as each day was horizontal driving sleet, which suddenly turned to blue sky and sunshine, then back to sleet again. It was bitterly cold.

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Jun 05, 2020 4:30 pm

After several weeks of Covid-19 "Lockdown", recent easing of government legislation (within England) currently allows travelling of any distance for the purpose of outdoor recreation and exercise, so long as social distancing measures are properly maintained.
Cumbria County Council and the Lake District National Park Authority are beginning to gradually "open up" the area to visitors once again, and the National Trust have reopened several of their car parks in the area. These authorities continue to advise that visitors should take all necessary measures to prevent potential Covid-19 transmission, and respect the needs of local communities.
In order to lessen the chances of call-outs, and minimise potential Covid-19 transmission to its members, the Lake District's Mountain Rescue Teams are currently advising walkers to keep within their limits, and for preference, refrain from venturing onto the high fells.
With these things in mind, but also with a burning desire to get out amongst the fells again, I decided to have a trip up to the Lakes on Monday, 1st of June, with the intention of doing an easy, low level circular amble, (of about nine miles overall), to visit Cathedral Cave, in the Little Langdale area.
Parking up in the National Trust car park beside the bridge at Elterwater, I walked along the riverside path in the direction of Skelwith Bridge. – To first visit Skelwith Force waterfall, then continuing on through various woods and fields to visit Cathedral Cave and Slater Bridge, before returning to Elterwater and the car.
Cathedral Cave is a remnant of the Little Langdale slate quarrying era of centuries past. It is an impressive cavernous chamber, with a huge central rock “pillar” supporting its roof.
Access to the cave is best gained via the "long tunnel", which is over 100yds in length, and has a headroom of about 5ft. The floor is level, but can be several inches deep in water at various parts along the way. - Fortunately, with all of the dry weather of late, there wasn't much water in evidence, and my boots remained dry!
NB: This tunnel is pitch black and needs a suitable head-torch or flashlight to safely negotiate its length. Note that the tunnel splits as you approach the Cathedral Cavern end. You should bear towards the "light at the end of the tunnel" which will be seen slightly towards your right hand side.
Walking to your right as you exit the tunnel brings you onto the "balcony viewpoint" of the upper level area, from where you can look down into the impressive chamber of Cathedral Cavern. Behind you at this point is an area of jumbled rocks and boulders, over which you can (with care!), safely scramble down to an arch-like opening, giving you access into the main chamber.
After visiting the main chamber, you can exit the cavern by the “short tunnel” which is only about fifteen yards long and doesn’t require a head torch/flashlight. From that exit point it’s then a straight forward short walk to Slater Bridge.
Not my typical "high fells" kind of Lake District walk, and with several "social distancing" and other Covid-19 measures needing to be taken into account. - But a great walk nevertheless, and oh so good just to be able to experience this fantastic area once again.

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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#GPS Track - 1 to 25000 Scale.jpg
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And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – Looking across Elterwater, towards the Langdale Pikes.
Photo 02 – Wetherlam, with Great Carrs beyond, as seen across the River Brathay.
Photo 03 – Skelwith Force.
Photo 04 – Woodburn Bridge – named in honour of local parish council chairman, Mr Trevor Woodburn.
Photo 05 – Little Langdale Quarries sign.
Photo 06 – The “long tunnel” entrance, leading to Cathedral Cavern.
Photo 07 – Looking down into Cathedral Cavern from the upper level.
Photo 08 – Looking across the main chamber after having scrambled down the "rock jumble.
Photo 09 – Looking back across the main chamber towards the upper level viewpoint.
Photo 10 – Slater Bridge, with part of Lingmoor Fell beyond.
Photo 11 – Little Langdale Tarn, as seen from the path towards High Birk Howe Farm, having just left Slater Bridge.
Photo 12 – Having completed the walk, and now on my way home, a final shot taken from beside the cattle grid near Elterwater village.
A shot that I've taken many times over the years, and one of my very favourite views of the Langdale Pikes

If you would like to see a more extensive description, and several more photos from this walk, see: -
https://www.walklakes.co.uk/forum/viewt ... =753#p1677
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sat Jul 11, 2020 1:20 pm

Wednesday 24th June was forecast to be a fine sunny day – the hottest day of the year so far. And, as things turned out, it certainly was!
Unfortunately not a great day for photography. Much UV haze around throughout the day, quite a lot of high level light cloud around during the morning, and very harsh lighting conditions during the afternoon.
Starting from a layby just north of Stybarrow Crag, (beside Ullswater on the A592), I took the little used track which follows Mossdale Beck through Glencoyne Wood, to my first summit of the day – Glenridding Dodd.
From there I backtracked slightly to the drystone wall, and then took the south-east ridge route up Heron Pike and onto Sheffield Pike.
From Sheffield Pike I descended slightly to Nick Head, regaining the height lost on the way up to Green Side, before continuing onwards to Stybarrow Dodd. From there I took the ridge across to Raise, followed by Whiteside and Helvellyn Lower Man, before reaching the main peak of the day – Helvellyn.
From Helvellyn summit I descended the headwall and crossed Striding Edge, High Spying How and Low Spying How, heading towards the “Hole-In-The-Wall” and my final summit of the day on Birkhouse Moor.
From there I took the Mires Beck (Little Cove) route back down to valley level, then crossing Rattlebeck Bridge and walking down Greenside Road into Glenridding before a final short walk along the A592 back to the car.

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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#GPS Track 1 to 25000 scale.jpg
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GPX Track superimposed onto 3D Aerial Image.
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#GPS Track 3D Aerial View (Annotated).jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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#Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
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And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – Looking across Birkhouse Moor to a cloud topped St.Sunday Crag and Fairfield. (Taken from Glenridding Dodd summit): -
Photo 02 – A stone seen on the flanks of Heron Pike, inscribed “H” on one side, and “M” on the other, and marking the boundary between the Howard (of Greystoke) estate, and the Marshall (of Patterdale) estate. – Ullswater in the distance: -
Photo 03 – A zoomed-in shot of Striding Edge and Helvellyn (from Heron Pike), with Catstye Cam in front, over towards right hand side of shot: -
Photo 04 – The first of two iron boundary marker posts. – This one on Heron Pike. These iron posts also mark the boundary between the Howard estate and the Marshall estate. The inscription on the other side also has the date 1912, but with letter “M” instead of “H”.
Photo 05 – The Helvellyn – Catstye Cam vista, as seen from the summit plateau on Sheffield Pike: -
Photo 06 – The second of the two Howard/Marshall iron marker posts. This one seen on Sheffield Pike on the approach to Nick Head.
The route from here up to Green Side’s summit follows the ribbon of darker green grass in centre of image: -
Photo 07 – Looking back to Stybarrow Dodd from Raise summit: -
Photo 08 – Looking west to Brown Cove Crags and Thirlmere. – From the ridge between Whiteside and Helvellyn Lower Man: -
Photo 09 – Looking north-east to Keppel Cove, with Catstye Cam prominent. – Sheffield Pike in middle distance and Ullswater beyond. As seen from the col between Helvellyn Lower Man and Helvellyn: -
Photo 10 – Red Tarn and Striding Edge: -
Photo 11 – Looking across from the ridge above Bleaberry Crag to Sheffield Pike / Nick Head / Green Side areas walked earlier in the day: -
Photo 12 – The “Hole-In-The-Wall”, with Birkhouse Moor beyond. – (Sheffield Pike and Green Side on horizon over to left hand side): -

If you would like to see a more extensive description, and lots more photos from this walk, see: -
https://www.walklakes.co.uk/forum/viewt ... ?f=2&t=757
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Attachments
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Common sense is not so common.

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adampembs
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by adampembs » Mon Jul 13, 2020 9:44 am

Another nice set of photos. Striding Edge always looks quite scary but I guess its not so bad on a warm sunny day without a lot of wind. Thanks Mike. :)
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